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New Data Shed Light on Potential Advantages of Pacritinib for Patients with Myelofibrosis

Dec 06, 2016

Pacritinib significantly reduces spleen size among people with myelofibrosis who have very low levels of platelets, compared with standard therapy. This was revealed as a late-breaking study presented during the 58th Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) in San Diego. It was also reported by the study investigators that patients taking a twice-daily dose of this investigational oral multikinase inhibitor experienced significant improvements in symptoms.

Additions to Standard Multiple Myeloma Therapy Do Not Appear to Yield Additional Benefit

Dec 06, 2016

Trial results presented during the ASH Annual Meeting suggest two therapies that are often added to standard therapy in patients with multiple myeloma do not improve rates of progression-free survival compared with the current standard course of treatment alone. The study is the largest randomized controlled trial of post-transplant therapy for multiple myeloma ever conducted in the United States.

First Multicenter Trial Finds CAR T-Cell Immunotherapy Effective, Feasible for Hard-to-Treat Lymphoma

Dec 06, 2016

A late-breaking abstract demonstrates that chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is a promising option for treating refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma and practical to implement in a variety of real-world clinical settings. This study, which tested a product called KTE-C19 (anti-CD19 CAR) and involved 22 institutions, is the first multicenter trial of this cellular immunotherapy-based treatment approach for lymphoma.

IKZF1 Gene Mutations Found to Increase Hereditary Risk for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia in Children

Dec 06, 2016

A late-breaking abstract identifies inherited genetic mutations in the gene IKZF1 that confer a higher likelihood of developing pediatric acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The findings are among the latest evidence to point to a strong inherited genetic basis of ALL risk in children. Some of the variants identified also appear to reduce sensitivity of cancer cells to a chemotherapy drug used for treating some types of ALL, potentially contributing to drug resistance.

Cancer Drug Ibrutinib Found Helpful in Treating Graft Versus Host Disease After Stem Cell Transplant

Dec 06, 2016

A late-breaking abstract presented during the ASH Annual Meeting shows patients who experience graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after stem cell transplantation that is not resolved by corticosteroid treatment may benefit from the use of ibrutinib, an anti-cancer drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in order to treat certain blood cancers.

Studies Advance a More Personalized Approach to Treatment

Dec 03, 2016

Studies presented during the ASH aim to bring a more personalized and targeted approach to medicine and empower patients to participate more fully in treatment decisions.

Sickle Cell Disease Research Shows Progress in Preventing Related Complications and Death

Dec 03, 2016

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited chronic disorder characterized by rigid, sickle-shaped red blood cells that get stuck in veins and block blood flow, which can cause severe pain, stroke, organ failure, and complications leading to death. Three studies presented during the ASH annual meeting reported on encouraging advances for SCD treatment that carry global public health implications.

Bioengineering Innovations Show Promise for Improving Treatments and Drug Delivery

Dec 03, 2016

In five studies presented, researchers are applying advanced biomedical engineering methods for improving the delivery of life-saving treatments to patients with a variety of medical conditions.

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